Savoy Theatre

Now showing at the Savoy Theatre

Dreamgirls

Discount available

30%
Off

Cheap Dreamgirls Tickets

Was: £20.00 Now: £20.00

Valid on Wed Matinee performances until 28 Jun 2017. Excludes 31 May 2017.

Dreamgirls

Thirty-five years after the ground-breaking original Broadway production, the UK and West End premiere of the sensational and iconic Tony Award®-winning musical Dreamgirls is now playing at the Savoy Theatre!

Booking from: Monday, 29th May 2017
Booking until: Saturday, 21st October 2017
Running time: 2 More Info

Savoy Theatre Seating Plan

Savoy Theatre

Savoy Theatre on the Map

How to get there: (5mins) Head out onto the main road Strand. Go right 200 metres and the theatre is on your right.

Address:
Strand
London
WC2R 0ET

Buses: 1, 4, 6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 23, 26, 59, 68, 76, 77a, 91, 168, 171, 172, 176, 188, 243, 341, 521, RV1

Nearest Underground: Charing Cross
Nearest Train: Charing Cross

Image

Designed by C.I.Phipps and decorated by Collinson & Locke, the most beautifully fitted theatre in Europe opened its doors on 10th October 1881 with a transfer from the Opera Comique of Gilbert and Sullivan's opera Patience. Built at the instigation of impresario Richard D'Oyly Carte, who wanted his own theatre in order to stage the works of Gilbert and Sullivan, the Savoy Theatre became famous as the first public building in the world to be lit by incandescent electric lights and in one way or another it has been blazing ever since.

On 3rd June 1929, the Victorian auditorium was invaded by workmen and demolished and 135 days later "a gleaming palace had sprung up", a magic miracle of modernism built by Rupert D'Oyly Carte with Frank Tugwell as the Architect and decorative designs by Basil Ionides. The Theatre re-opened on 21st October, 1929 with a revival of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Gondoliers, designed by Charles Ricketts and conducted by Dr. Malcolm Sargent.

Loved, and eventually listed, the Savoy Theatre's auditorium, ravaged by fire in the early hours of 12th February 1990, has now been triumphantly and dazzlingly recreated under the guidance of the theatre's late chairman, Sir Hugh Wontner, and the distinguished architect, Sir William Whitfield. The auditorium and public areas have been faithfully restored to the 1929 vision of Tugwell and Ionides.